Artificial sweetners: Aspartame, Acesulfame-K and Saccharin.

SKU
Artificial sweetners: Aspartame, Acesulfame-K and Saccharin.
£120.00
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Artificial sweetners: Aspartame, Acesulfame-K and Saccharin.
  • Method Used
    HPLC-UV
  • LOD (Level of Detection)
    10 - 100mg/kg
  • Accreditation
    Yes
  • Minimum Sample
    100ml

Using ion-pair reversed phase HPLC coupled with UV detection Fera’s food safety experts can analyse your wine samples for the presence of the artificial sweeteners aspartame (E951), acesulfame-K (E950) and saccharin (E954).

Sweeteners in wine are a known method of reducing cost to achieve improved economic gain, as well as being a key method to create uniform wine characteristics across a changing grape growing environment. Sweeteners may also be used as an alternative to chaptalisation methods, which are known to be prohibited in some areas and usually frowned upon by industry. To ensure your produce is of high quality and maintains the integrity your customers have come to expect, Fera can highlight the presence and levels of these sweeteners within your wine samples. This data can then be used to inform your production methods, and ensure your product meets your quality assurance standards.

Fera’s flexible methods can be utilised to highlight levels of these sweeteners within both food and drink samples, as well as wine. Our analysis methods meet legislative limits imposed by national regulators, namely Maximum Residue Limits (MRLs), to ensure foodstuffs remain safe for consumers and products continue to be produced as designed.

EU MRLs are produced to ensure safe foodstuffs are offered to consumers. These limits are routinely amended and updated, encompassing new research and insights. As a result, ongoing due diligence testing activities should be utilised to ensure your foodstuffs remain compliant.

Aspartame (E951), acesulfame-K (E950) and saccharin (E954) are low-calorie artificial sweeteners which are considerably sweeter than sugar but have a much lower calorific value. As a result, these sweeteners are heavily used within reduced-calorie products. They are authorised to be used as food additives in drinks, desserts, sweets, dairy, chewing gums, energy-reducing and weight control products and as a table-top sweetener. If added to a food or drink the sweetener must be declared on the label either by its name or its E number. Fera can highlight these sweeteners across a range of food and drink samples.


Submitting your Sample

When submitting your sample please include the food sample submission form to allow us to process your samples efficiently. Failure to send a sample submission form may result in a delay of your sample being tested.

Download the food sample submission form here.

Detail

Specification

Method

HPLC-UV

Sample Information

100ml

Minimum Sample Quantity (Batch Size)

1

Target LOQ

10 mg/kg saccharin and acesulfame-K
100 mg/kg aspartame

Accredited

Yes

Turnaround Time

10 working days

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